Buttoning women’s clothes. Not as simple as you’d think.

Have you ever noticed that buttons and zippers are one side on men’s clothing, but the other side on women’s clothing? It’s true! Apparently the reason for the difference is that historically, wealthy women had such complicated clothing that they often had servants dress them, while wealthy men still usually dressed themselves. If I suddenly turn into a millionaire one day, somehow I still don’t think I’ll have the urge to hire someone to button up my shirt for me. (thanks MissouriQuiltCo.com)

More Facts About Cats:

Domesticated cats use vocalizations like meowing, purring and hissing – but feral cats are practically silent.

* Cats can pass their body through any space which they can fit their heads through.

* With extra thick enamel, less damaging saliva, less food retention between teeth and a mostly sugar-free diet, cats have better chompers than humans (this doesn’t mean they can’t have dental problems, so pay attention to your furry friend’s teeth!)

* Thanks to their powerful livers, cats can survive by drinking seawater if they have to.

* Cats’ life spans are on the rise – in the early 1980s cats were only expected to live seven years; now they are expected to live 12 – 15!

ℜ𝔢𝔩𝔞𝔵𝔞𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔫 𝔖𝔞𝔱𝔲𝔯𝔞𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔫?

ℑ 𝔰𝔲𝔰𝔭𝔢𝔠𝔱 𝔯𝔢𝔩𝔞𝔵𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔦𝔰 𝔢𝔳𝔢𝔫 𝔪𝔬𝔯𝔢 𝔦𝔪𝔭𝔬𝔯𝔱𝔞𝔫𝔱 𝔦𝔫 𝔱𝔬𝔡𝔞𝔶’𝔰 𝔴𝔬𝔯𝔩𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔫 𝔦𝔱 𝔴𝔞𝔰 𝔦𝔫 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔭𝔞𝔰𝔱. 𝔅𝔲𝔱 𝔯𝔢𝔩𝔞𝔵𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔦𝔫 𝔞 𝔭𝔬𝔬𝔩 𝔣𝔲𝔩𝔩 𝔬𝔣 𝔰𝔞𝔨𝔢, 𝔠𝔬𝔣𝔣𝔢𝔢, 𝔤𝔯𝔢𝔢𝔫 𝔱𝔢𝔞, 𝔬𝔯 𝔢𝔳𝔢𝔫 𝔯𝔢𝔡 𝔴𝔦𝔫𝔢? ℜ𝔢𝔞𝔩𝔩𝔶? 𝔜𝔬𝔲 𝔠𝔞𝔫 𝔦𝔫 𝔍𝔞𝔭𝔞𝔫, 𝔴𝔥𝔦𝔠𝔥 𝔪𝔞𝔨𝔢𝔰 𝔪𝔢 𝔯𝔢𝔞𝔩𝔦𝔷𝔢 𝔥𝔬𝔴 𝔡𝔦𝔣𝔣𝔢𝔯𝔢𝔫𝔱 𝔠𝔲𝔩𝔱𝔲𝔯𝔢𝔰 𝔠𝔞𝔫 𝔟𝔢 𝔣𝔯𝔬𝔪 𝔬𝔫𝔢 𝔞𝔫𝔬𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔯. ℑ 𝔪𝔢𝔞𝔫, 𝔥𝔬𝔴 𝔡𝔬 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔶 𝔨𝔢𝔢𝔭 𝔭𝔢𝔬𝔭𝔩𝔢 𝔣𝔯𝔬𝔪 𝔡𝔯𝔦𝔫𝔨𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔰𝔱𝔲𝔣𝔣 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔶 𝔞𝔯𝔢 𝔟𝔞𝔱𝔥𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔦𝔫? 𝔖𝔠𝔯𝔢𝔞𝔪𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔬𝔯 𝔶𝔢𝔩𝔩𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔦𝔰 𝔯𝔢𝔠𝔬𝔪𝔪𝔢𝔫𝔡𝔢𝔡 𝔦𝔫 𝔬𝔲𝔯 𝔠𝔲𝔩𝔱𝔲𝔯𝔢 𝔞𝔰 𝔞 𝔴𝔞𝔶 𝔱𝔬 𝔯𝔢𝔩𝔢𝔞𝔰𝔢 𝔱𝔢𝔫𝔰𝔦𝔬𝔫. 𝔄𝔩𝔩 𝔨𝔦𝔫𝔡𝔰 𝔬𝔣 𝔭𝔰𝔶𝔠𝔥𝔬𝔩𝔬𝔤𝔦𝔰𝔱 𝔱𝔶𝔭𝔢𝔰 𝔯𝔢𝔠𝔬𝔪𝔪𝔢𝔫𝔡 𝔦𝔱. ℑ𝔱’𝔰 𝔢𝔳𝔢𝔫 𝔤𝔬𝔱 𝔞 𝔫𝔞𝔪𝔢. 𝔖𝔠𝔯𝔢𝔞𝔪 𝔗𝔥𝔢𝔯𝔞𝔭𝔶. 𝔅𝔲𝔱 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔯𝔢 𝔠𝔞𝔫 𝔟𝔢 𝔭𝔯𝔬𝔟𝔩𝔢𝔪𝔰 𝔴𝔦𝔱𝔥 𝔱𝔥𝔦𝔰 𝔭𝔞𝔯𝔱𝔦𝔠𝔲𝔩𝔞𝔯 𝔱𝔢𝔠𝔥𝔫𝔦𝔮𝔲𝔢. 𝔄𝔫𝔡 𝔰𝔬𝔩𝔲𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔫𝔰 𝔱𝔬 𝔱𝔥𝔬𝔰𝔢 𝔭𝔯𝔬𝔟𝔩𝔢𝔪𝔰. ℑ 𝔯𝔢𝔞𝔡 𝔬𝔫𝔢 𝔰𝔬𝔩𝔲𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔫 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔬𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔯 𝔡𝔞𝔶 𝔦𝔫 𝔞 𝔟𝔩𝔬𝔤. 𝔗𝔥𝔢 𝔟𝔩𝔬𝔤𝔤𝔢𝔯 𝔰𝔲𝔤𝔤𝔢𝔰𝔱𝔢𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱 𝔦𝔣 𝔶𝔬𝔲 𝔩𝔦𝔳𝔢 𝔦𝔫 𝔞 𝔥𝔢𝔞𝔳𝔦𝔩𝔶 𝔭𝔬𝔭𝔲𝔩𝔞𝔱𝔢𝔡 𝔞𝔯𝔢𝔞 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔡𝔬𝔫’𝔱 𝔴𝔞𝔫𝔱 𝔭𝔢𝔬𝔭𝔩𝔢 𝔱𝔬 𝔠𝔞𝔩𝔩 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔩𝔞𝔴 𝔴𝔥𝔢𝔫 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔶 𝔥𝔢𝔞𝔯 𝔶𝔬𝔲 𝔰𝔠𝔯𝔢𝔞𝔪𝔦𝔫𝔤, 𝔶𝔬𝔲 𝔪𝔦𝔤𝔥𝔱 𝔠𝔬𝔫𝔰𝔦𝔡𝔢𝔯 𝔭𝔯𝔢𝔱𝔢𝔫𝔡𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱 𝔶𝔬𝔲’𝔯𝔢 𝔱𝔯𝔶𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔱𝔬 𝔤𝔢𝔱 𝔞 𝔣𝔯𝔦𝔢𝔫𝔡’𝔰 𝔞𝔱𝔱𝔢𝔫𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔫. 𝔖𝔦𝔪𝔭𝔩𝔶 𝔶𝔢𝔩𝔩 𝔞 𝔪𝔞𝔡𝔢-𝔲𝔭 𝔫𝔞𝔪𝔢 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔰𝔬𝔬𝔫 𝔶𝔬𝔲’𝔩𝔩 𝔥𝔞𝔳𝔢 𝔞𝔩𝔩 𝔨𝔦𝔫𝔡𝔰 𝔬𝔣 𝔭𝔢𝔬𝔭𝔩𝔢 𝔥𝔢𝔩𝔭𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔶𝔬𝔲 𝔣𝔦𝔫𝔡 𝔰𝔬𝔪𝔢𝔬𝔫𝔢. 𝔚𝔥𝔬 𝔨𝔫𝔬𝔴𝔰, 𝔶𝔬𝔲 𝔪𝔦𝔤𝔥𝔱 𝔤𝔢𝔱 𝔰𝔬𝔪𝔢 𝔫𝔢𝔴 𝔣𝔯𝔦𝔢𝔫𝔡𝔰 𝔬𝔲𝔱 𝔬𝔣 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔡𝔢𝔞𝔩. 𝔗𝔥𝔞𝔱 𝔴𝔬𝔲𝔩𝔡 𝔟𝔢 𝔯𝔢𝔞𝔩𝔩𝔶 𝔤𝔬𝔬𝔡 𝔣𝔬𝔯 𝔰𝔱𝔯𝔢𝔰𝔰. 𝔒𝔯 𝔡𝔬 𝔴𝔥𝔞𝔱 ℑ 𝔡𝔬. ℑ’𝔪 𝔣𝔬𝔯𝔱𝔲𝔫𝔞𝔱𝔢 𝔱𝔬 𝔩𝔦𝔳𝔢 𝔦𝔫 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔫𝔬𝔯𝔱𝔥 𝔴𝔬𝔬𝔡𝔰 𝔬𝔣 𝔐𝔦𝔫𝔫𝔢𝔰𝔬𝔱𝔞, 𝔰𝔬 𝔴𝔥𝔢𝔫 𝔩𝔦𝔣𝔢 𝔦𝔰 𝔞 𝔟𝔦𝔱 𝔪𝔲𝔠𝔥, ℑ 𝔰𝔦𝔪𝔭𝔩𝔶 𝔴𝔞𝔩𝔨 𝔬𝔲𝔱𝔰𝔦𝔡𝔢 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔨𝔢𝔢𝔭 𝔤𝔬𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔲𝔫𝔱𝔦𝔩 ℑ’𝔪 𝔟𝔢𝔶𝔬𝔫𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔶𝔞𝔯𝔡, 𝔴𝔥𝔦𝔠𝔥 𝔦𝔰 𝔡𝔢𝔣𝔦𝔫𝔢𝔡 𝔟𝔶 𝔴𝔥𝔢𝔯𝔢 𝔴𝔢 𝔰𝔱𝔬𝔭 𝔠𝔲𝔱𝔱𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔤𝔯𝔞𝔰𝔰 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱 𝔳𝔞𝔯𝔦𝔢𝔰 𝔣𝔯𝔬𝔪 𝔶𝔢𝔞𝔯 𝔱𝔬 𝔶𝔢𝔞𝔯, 𝔡𝔢𝔭𝔢𝔫𝔡𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔬𝔫 𝔥𝔬𝔴 𝔞𝔪𝔟𝔦𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔲𝔰 𝔴𝔢 𝔞𝔯𝔢 𝔟𝔲𝔱 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔯𝔢 𝔦𝔰 𝔞𝔩𝔴𝔞𝔶𝔰 𝔞 𝔡𝔢𝔪𝔞𝔯𝔠𝔞𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔫 𝔟𝔢𝔱𝔴𝔢𝔢𝔫 𝔶𝔞𝔯𝔡 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔣𝔬𝔯𝔢𝔰𝔱. 𝔄𝔫𝔶𝔴𝔞𝔶, ℑ 𝔧𝔲𝔰𝔱 𝔨𝔢𝔢𝔭 𝔴𝔞𝔩𝔨𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔲𝔫𝔱𝔦𝔩 ℑ’𝔪 𝔦𝔫 𝔤𝔯𝔞𝔰𝔰 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱’𝔰 𝔨𝔫𝔢𝔢 𝔡𝔢𝔢𝔭 𝔬𝔯 𝔡𝔢𝔢𝔭𝔢𝔯 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔞𝔪 𝔰𝔲𝔯𝔯𝔬𝔲𝔫𝔡𝔢𝔡 𝔟𝔶 𝔱𝔯𝔢𝔢𝔰 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔫 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔰𝔱𝔯𝔢𝔰𝔰 𝔧𝔲𝔰𝔱 𝔪𝔢𝔩𝔱𝔰 𝔞𝔴𝔞𝔶. 𝔘𝔫𝔩𝔢𝔰𝔰 𝔦𝔱’𝔰 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔪𝔦𝔡𝔡𝔩𝔢 𝔬𝔣 𝔴𝔦𝔫𝔱𝔢𝔯 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔰𝔫𝔬𝔴 𝔦𝔰 𝔱𝔥𝔯𝔢𝔢 𝔣𝔢𝔢𝔱 𝔡𝔢𝔢𝔭 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔱𝔢𝔪𝔭𝔢𝔯𝔞𝔱𝔲𝔯𝔢 𝔦𝔰 𝔚𝔄𝔜 𝔟𝔢𝔩𝔬𝔴 𝔷𝔢𝔯𝔬. 𝔗𝔥𝔢𝔫 ℑ 𝔰𝔱𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔞𝔱 𝔞 𝔴𝔦𝔫𝔡𝔬𝔴 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔯𝔢𝔪𝔦𝔫𝔡 𝔪𝔶𝔰𝔢𝔩𝔣 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱 𝔦𝔱’𝔰 𝔞𝔟𝔰𝔬𝔩𝔲𝔱𝔢𝔩𝔶 𝔟𝔢𝔞𝔲𝔱𝔦𝔣𝔲𝔩 𝔬𝔲𝔱 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔯𝔢 (𝔴𝔥𝔦𝔠𝔥 𝔦𝔱 𝔦𝔰!) 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔥𝔬𝔴 𝔣𝔬𝔯𝔱𝔲𝔫𝔞𝔱𝔢 ℑ 𝔞𝔪 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱 ℑ 𝔡𝔬𝔫’𝔱 𝔥𝔞𝔳𝔢 𝔱𝔬 𝔤𝔬 𝔬𝔲𝔱 𝔦𝔫 𝔰𝔲𝔠𝔥 𝔯𝔦𝔡𝔦𝔠𝔲𝔩𝔬𝔲𝔰𝔩𝔶 𝔠𝔬𝔩𝔡 𝔴𝔢𝔞𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔯 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱 𝔩𝔦𝔱𝔱𝔩𝔢 𝔪𝔢𝔫𝔱𝔞𝔩 𝔢𝔵𝔢𝔯𝔠𝔦𝔰𝔢 𝔴𝔬𝔯𝔨𝔰 𝔢𝔳𝔢𝔯𝔶 𝔱𝔦𝔪𝔢. 𝔖𝔱𝔯𝔢𝔰𝔰 𝔦𝔰 𝔤𝔬𝔫𝔢! (𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔫𝔨𝔰 𝔐𝔦𝔰𝔰𝔬𝔲𝔯𝔦𝔔𝔲𝔦𝔩𝔱ℭ𝔬.𝔠𝔬𝔪)

Stars, Stripes, America and John Philip Sousa

𝓢𝓽𝓪𝓻𝓼, 𝓢𝓽𝓻𝓲𝓹𝓮𝓼, 𝓐𝓶𝓮𝓻𝓲𝓬𝓪! 𝓐𝓶𝓮𝓻𝓲𝓬𝓪𝓷𝓼 𝓱𝓪𝓿𝓮 𝓙𝓸𝓱𝓷 𝓟𝓱𝓲𝓵𝓲𝓹 𝓢𝓸𝓾𝓼𝓪 𝓽𝓸 𝓽𝓱𝓪𝓷𝓴 𝓯𝓸𝓻 𝓸𝓾𝓻 𝓫𝓮𝓼𝓽 𝓹𝓪𝓽𝓻𝓲𝓸𝓽𝓲𝓬 𝓶𝓪𝓻𝓬𝓱𝓮𝓼. 𝓣𝓱𝓮 𝓶𝓾𝓼𝓲𝓬 𝔂𝓸𝓾 𝓱𝓮𝓪𝓻 𝓪𝓽 𝓪 4𝓽𝓱 𝓸𝓯 𝓙𝓾𝓵𝔂 𝓹𝓪𝓻𝓪𝓭𝓮? 𝓣𝓱𝓲𝓷𝓴 𝓙𝓸𝓱𝓷 𝓟𝓱𝓲𝓵𝓲𝓹 𝓢𝓸𝓾𝓼𝓪. 𝓗𝓮 𝔀𝓻𝓸𝓽𝓮 “𝓣𝓱𝓮 𝓢𝓽𝓪𝓻𝓼 𝓪𝓷𝓭 𝓢𝓽𝓻𝓲𝓹𝓮𝓼 𝓕𝓸𝓻𝓮𝓿𝓮𝓻” 𝓸𝓷 𝓱𝓲𝓼 𝔀𝓪𝔂 𝓱𝓸𝓶𝓮 𝓯𝓻𝓸𝓶 𝓪 𝓿𝓪𝓬𝓪𝓽𝓲𝓸𝓷 𝓪𝓫𝓻𝓸𝓪𝓭. 𝓑𝓮𝓲𝓷𝓰 𝓸𝓷 𝓪 𝓼𝓱𝓲𝓹, 𝔀𝓲𝓽𝓱 𝓼𝓱𝓲𝓹𝓼 𝓫𝓮𝓲𝓷𝓰 𝓼𝓵𝓸𝔀𝓮𝓻 𝓽𝓻𝓪𝓿𝓮𝓵 𝓽𝓱𝓪𝓷 𝔀𝓱𝓪𝓽 𝔀𝓮 𝓮𝔁𝓹𝓮𝓻𝓲𝓮𝓷𝓬𝓮 𝓽𝓸𝓭𝓪𝔂, 𝓱𝓮 𝓱𝓪𝓭 𝓪 𝓵𝓸𝓽 𝓸𝓯 𝓽𝓲𝓶𝓮 𝓽𝓸 𝓼𝓹𝓮𝓷𝓭 𝓸𝓷 𝓽𝓱𝓮 𝓵𝓸𝓷𝓰 𝓿𝓸𝔂𝓪𝓰𝓮 𝓪𝓷𝓭 𝓱𝓮 𝓾𝓼𝓮𝓭 𝓽𝓱𝓪𝓽 𝓽𝓲𝓶𝓮 𝓽𝓸 𝔀𝓻𝓲𝓽𝓮 𝓽𝓱𝓮 𝓮𝓷𝓽𝓲𝓻𝓮 𝓹𝓲𝓮𝓬𝓮 𝓹𝓪𝓬𝓲𝓷𝓰 𝓽𝓱𝓮 𝓭𝓮𝓬𝓴 𝔀𝓲𝓽𝓱 𝓽𝓱𝓮 𝓐𝓶𝓮𝓻𝓲𝓬𝓪𝓷 𝓯𝓵𝓪𝓰 𝓯𝓵𝔂𝓲𝓷𝓰 𝓯𝓻𝓸𝓶 𝓽𝓱𝓮 𝓯𝓸𝓻𝓮𝓶𝓪𝓼𝓽. 𝓐𝓷𝓭 𝓱𝓮 𝓷𝓮𝓿𝓮𝓻 𝔀𝓻𝓸𝓽𝓮 𝓭𝓸𝔀𝓷 𝓪 𝓷𝓸𝓽𝓮. 𝓝𝓸𝓽 𝓾𝓷𝓽𝓲𝓵 𝓽𝓱𝓮 𝓼𝓱𝓲𝓹 𝓭𝓸𝓬𝓴𝓮𝓭 𝓭𝓲𝓭 𝓱𝓮 𝓪𝓬𝓽𝓾𝓪𝓵𝓵𝔂 𝔀𝓻𝓸𝓽𝓮 𝓪𝓷𝔂 𝓸𝓯 𝓲𝓽 𝓭𝓸𝔀𝓷! 𝓤𝓷𝓽𝓲𝓵 𝓽𝓱𝓮𝓷, 𝓱𝓮 𝓪𝓻𝓻𝓪𝓷𝓰𝓮𝓭 𝓲𝓽 𝓪𝓵𝓵 𝓲𝓷 𝓱𝓲𝓼 𝓱𝓮𝓪𝓭. 𝓝𝓸𝓽 𝓸𝓷𝓵𝔂 𝓭𝓲𝓭 𝓱𝓮 𝓬𝓸𝓶𝓹𝓸𝓼𝓮 𝓶𝓾𝓼𝓲𝓬 𝓽𝓱𝓪𝓽 𝔀𝓮𝓷𝓽 𝓭𝓸𝔀𝓷 𝓲𝓷 𝓱𝓲𝓼𝓽𝓸𝓻𝔂, 𝓱𝓮 𝓭𝓲𝓭 𝓲𝓽 𝔀𝓲𝓽𝓱𝓸𝓾𝓽 𝓪 𝓹𝓮𝓷! (𝓽𝓱𝓪𝓷𝓴𝓼 𝓜𝓲𝓼𝓼𝓸𝓾𝓻𝓲𝓠𝓾𝓲𝓵𝓽𝓒𝓸.𝓬𝓸𝓶)

Independence Day thoughts

 

𝕬𝖘 𝖜𝖊 𝖈𝖊𝖑𝖊𝖇𝖗𝖆𝖙𝖊 𝕴𝖓𝖉𝖊𝖕𝖊𝖓𝖉𝖊𝖓𝖈𝖊 𝕯𝖆𝖞 𝖙𝖍𝖎𝖘 𝖘𝖚𝖒𝖒𝖊𝖗, 𝕴’𝖒 𝖌𝖗𝖆𝖙𝖊𝖋𝖚𝖑 𝖋𝖔𝖗 𝖙𝖍𝖊 𝖕𝖊𝖔𝖕𝖑𝖊 𝖎𝖓 𝕬𝖒𝖊𝖗𝖎𝖈𝖆𝖓 𝖍𝖎𝖘𝖙𝖔𝖗𝖞 𝖙𝖍𝖆𝖙 𝖍𝖆𝖛𝖊 𝖑𝖔𝖛𝖊𝖉 𝖆𝖓𝖉 𝖘𝖊𝖗𝖛𝖊𝖉 𝖙𝖍𝖊𝖎𝖗 𝖈𝖔𝖚𝖓𝖙𝖗𝖞 𝖘𝖔 𝖜𝖊𝖑𝖑. 𝕿𝖍𝖊𝖗𝖊’𝖘 𝖆 𝖘𝖙𝖔𝖗𝖞 𝖆𝖇𝖔𝖚𝖙 𝕲𝖊𝖔𝖗𝖌𝖊 𝖂𝖆𝖘𝖍𝖎𝖓𝖌𝖙𝖔𝖓 𝖆𝖙 𝖆 𝖙𝖎𝖒𝖊 𝖜𝖍𝖊𝖓 𝖍𝖊 𝖜𝖆𝖘 𝖘𝖙𝖎𝖑𝖑 𝖆 𝖌𝖊𝖓𝖊𝖗𝖆𝖑 𝖆𝖓𝖉 𝖓𝖔𝖙 𝖞𝖊𝖙 𝖕𝖗𝖊𝖘𝖎𝖉𝖊𝖓𝖙 𝖆𝖓𝖉 𝖍𝖎𝖘 𝖙𝖗𝖔𝖔𝖕𝖘 𝖜𝖊𝖗𝖊 𝖌𝖊𝖙𝖙𝖎𝖓𝖌 𝖆𝖌𝖎𝖙𝖆𝖙𝖊𝖉. 𝕿𝖍𝖊𝖎𝖗 𝖕𝖆𝖞 𝖍𝖆𝖉 𝖇𝖊𝖊𝖓 𝖉𝖊𝖑𝖆𝖞𝖊𝖉 𝖆𝖓𝖉 𝖒𝖆𝖓𝖞 𝖔𝖋 𝖙𝖍𝖊𝖒 𝖜𝖆𝖓𝖙𝖊𝖉 𝖙𝖔 𝖌𝖔 𝖍𝖔𝖒𝖊. 𝖂𝖆𝖘𝖍𝖎𝖓𝖌𝖙𝖔𝖓 𝖍𝖆𝖉 𝖊𝖛𝖊𝖓 𝖍𝖊𝖆𝖗𝖉 𝖜𝖍𝖎𝖘𝖕𝖊𝖗𝖘 𝖔𝖋 𝖕𝖑𝖆𝖓𝖘 𝖋𝖔𝖗 𝖒𝖚𝖙𝖎𝖓𝖞. 𝕳𝖊 𝖐𝖓𝖊𝖜 𝖍𝖊 𝖍𝖆𝖉 𝖙𝖔 𝖉𝖔 𝖘𝖔𝖒𝖊𝖙𝖍𝖎𝖓𝖌 𝖙𝖔 𝖗𝖊-𝖊𝖓𝖊𝖗𝖌𝖎𝖟𝖊 𝖍𝖎𝖘 𝖒𝖊𝖓, 𝖘𝖔 𝖍𝖊 𝖈𝖆𝖑𝖑𝖊𝖉 𝖙𝖍𝖊𝖒 𝖙𝖔𝖌𝖊𝖙𝖍𝖊𝖗 𝖙𝖔 𝖗𝖊𝖆𝖉 𝖙𝖍𝖊𝖒 𝖆 𝖑𝖊𝖙𝖙𝖊𝖗 𝖋𝖗𝖔𝖒 𝕮𝖔𝖓𝖌𝖗𝖊𝖘𝖘. 𝕳𝖊 𝖔𝖕𝖊𝖓𝖊𝖉 𝖙𝖍𝖊 𝖑𝖊𝖙𝖙𝖊𝖗 𝖆𝖓𝖉 𝖘𝖙𝖆𝖗𝖊𝖉 𝖆𝖙 𝖙𝖍𝖊 𝖕𝖆𝖌𝖊, 𝖇𝖚𝖙 𝖍𝖊 𝖍𝖊𝖘𝖎𝖙𝖆𝖙𝖊𝖉 𝖋𝖔𝖗 𝖘𝖔𝖒𝖊 𝖙𝖎𝖒𝖊. 𝕰𝖛𝖊𝖓𝖙𝖚𝖆𝖑𝖑𝖞 𝖍𝖊 𝖘𝖚𝖗𝖕𝖗𝖎𝖘𝖊𝖉 𝖍𝖎𝖘 𝖙𝖗𝖔𝖔𝖕𝖘 𝖇𝖞 𝖙𝖆𝖐𝖎𝖓𝖌 𝖘𝖔𝖒𝖊𝖙𝖍𝖎𝖓𝖌 𝖔𝖚𝖙 𝖔𝖋 𝖍𝖎𝖘 𝖕𝖔𝖈𝖐𝖊𝖙 𝖙𝖍𝖆𝖙 𝖒𝖆𝖓𝖞 𝖉𝖎𝖉𝖓’𝖙 𝖊𝖛𝖊𝖓 𝖐𝖓𝖔𝖜 𝖍𝖊 𝖍𝖆𝖉: 𝖆 𝖕𝖆𝖎𝖗 𝖔𝖋 𝖌𝖑𝖆𝖘𝖘𝖊𝖘. 𝕳𝖊 𝖘𝖆𝖎𝖉 𝖙𝖔 𝖙𝖍𝖊 𝖒𝖊𝖓 𝖌𝖆𝖙𝖍𝖊𝖗𝖊𝖉 𝖆𝖗𝖔𝖚𝖓𝖉: “𝕲𝖊𝖓𝖙𝖑𝖊𝖒𝖊𝖓, 𝖞𝖔𝖚 𝖜𝖎𝖑𝖑 𝖕𝖊𝖗𝖒𝖎𝖙 𝖒𝖊 𝖙𝖔 𝖕𝖚𝖙 𝖔𝖓 𝖒𝖞 𝖘𝖕𝖊𝖈𝖙𝖆𝖈𝖑𝖊𝖘, 𝖋𝖔𝖗 𝕴 𝖍𝖆𝖛𝖊 𝖓𝖔𝖙 𝖔𝖓𝖑𝖞 𝖌𝖗𝖔𝖜𝖓 𝖌𝖗𝖆𝖞 𝖇𝖚𝖙 𝖆𝖑𝖒𝖔𝖘𝖙 𝖇𝖑𝖎𝖓𝖉 𝖎𝖓 𝖙𝖍𝖊 𝖘𝖊𝖗𝖛𝖎𝖈𝖊 𝖔𝖋 𝖒𝖞 𝖈𝖔𝖚𝖓𝖙𝖗𝖞.” (𝖙𝖍𝖆𝖓𝖐𝖘 𝕸𝖎𝖘𝖘𝖔𝖚𝖗𝖎𝕼𝖚𝖎𝖑𝖙𝕮𝖔.𝖈𝖔𝖒)

Naming Games

ℙ𝕖𝕠𝕡𝕝𝕖 𝕙𝕒𝕧𝕖 𝕗𝕦𝕟 𝕟𝕒𝕞𝕚𝕟𝕘 𝕥𝕨𝕚𝕟 𝕓𝕒𝕓𝕚𝕖𝕤. ℂ𝕠𝕟𝕤𝕚𝕕𝕖𝕣 𝔹𝕠𝕟𝕟𝕚𝕖 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔻𝕠𝕟𝕟𝕚𝕖, 𝕋𝕒𝕪𝕝𝕠𝕣 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝕋𝕪𝕝𝕖𝕣, 𝕠𝕣 𝔸𝕧𝕒 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔸𝕟𝕟𝕒. 𝕆𝕣, 𝕨𝕚𝕥𝕙 𝕒 𝕓𝕚𝕥 𝕞𝕠𝕣𝕖 𝕚𝕞𝕒𝕘𝕚𝕟𝕒𝕥𝕚𝕠𝕟, 𝔻𝕠𝕣𝕠𝕥𝕙𝕪 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔻𝕒𝕤𝕙𝕚𝕖𝕝 (𝔻𝕠𝕥 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔻𝕒𝕤𝕙), 𝕀𝕟𝕕𝕚 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔸𝕟𝕟𝕒, 𝔹𝕒𝕤𝕜𝕚𝕟 𝕒𝕟𝕕 ℝ𝕠𝕓𝕓𝕚𝕟𝕤, 𝔸𝕓𝕖 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝕃𝕚𝕟𝕔𝕠𝕝𝕟, 𝔹𝕖𝕟 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝕁𝕖𝕣𝕣𝕪, 𝕠𝕣 𝔼𝕝𝕚𝕫𝕒𝕓𝕖𝕥𝕙 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔹𝕖𝕥𝕙𝕒𝕟𝕪 (𝔹𝕖𝕥𝕙 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔹𝕖𝕥𝕙). 𝕀 𝕝𝕠𝕧𝕖 𝕡𝕖𝕠𝕡𝕝𝕖 𝕨𝕚𝕥𝕙 𝕤𝕦𝕔𝕙 𝕚𝕞𝕒𝕘𝕚𝕟𝕒𝕥𝕚𝕠𝕟! (𝕋𝕙𝕒𝕟𝕜𝕤 𝕄𝕚𝕤𝕤𝕠𝕦𝕣𝕚ℚ𝕦𝕚𝕝𝕥ℂ𝕠.𝕔𝕠𝕞)

The sun burns hot and fast

The sun is the brightest star in our sky, but that’s just because it happens to be the closest. Deneb, a star a couple thousand light years away, is far brighter than the sun but because it burns so much brighter, it will also burn out much faster than the sun. Our sun will last 1,000 times longer than Deneb. Which makes me think of my recent husband. Like whomever Edna St Vincent Millay wrote about in her poem, he lived life fully. Burned his candle at both ends. Wore his body out. But he enjoyed every day. Every minute. Every second. I’m different. I live slowly, always did. I suspect that in the final reckoning we’ll both have had about the same amount of actual living during our times on earth.

Immortal Artistry

We humans are artists. And we like to tell everyone willing to listen that we exist. Thousands of years ago, cave painters signed their paintings with the shape of the artist’s hand and left them there for us to see and exclaim over. Really old paint on a cave wall now tells posterity that they existed and were artists, famous in their own time. Kings and nobles, too, left their literal imprint on history. They pressed their personal seals into melted wax with a signet ring when sending messages about wars, love interests, money and practically everything else, and woe to anyone who used their seals without permission! But anyone, even those who couldn’t read or write, could authorize a document by making a cross at the bottom of the document, a symbol of Christian honesty. I like that idea. (Thanks, MissouriQuiltCo.com)

Dark Sky Above

The International Dark Sky Association seeks and encourages darkness. Loves the dark. Believes in night. They encourage communities to turn out more lights at night. Cities that meet their standards for darkness are certified as Dark Sky Places. The whole point is to make viewing the night sky easier and better. Light makes viewing harder. Would those early explorers have been able to navigate around the world if there had been bright lights everywhere back then? Would we even have considered other planets as places of interest? Probably not. One of the largest telescopes on earth – the Atacama Large Array — is located in the Atacama Desert of South America, partly because of the altitude but also because it’s so sparsely settled that the sky is dark – really dark – and they are able to see far into space better. So let’s keep the sky as dark as possible. (Thanks MissouriQuiltCo.com)

Some people get stung, others get honey.

Some years ago, we raised bees. It didn’t become a permanent thing because it turned out to be way more complex than we’d imagined. But that very complexity — and the fascinating bees themselves — made a lasting imprint on me.

For instance, I learned that some people can naturally handle bees without getting stung. And others had better watch out. They’d better use netting and smoke and still be careful. We had one son who was the former kind of beekeeper. He could do just about anything without upsetting the bees. When I asked him what his secret was, he just shrugged and said he didn’t know.

We loved producing our own honey. We sucked at keeping bees alive over the winter. We didn’t have the latest equipment to get the honey from the combs so it was a lot of work. And we never forgot our experiences raising bees.

Once we saw bees swarm. We thought it was our hives until we checked and they were all where they should be, which meant it was a wild swarm. We followed them through our property, in and out of trees and across the fields. We wondered if they were considering any of the trees on our property as a future home. But they reached our property line and kept going. We never knew where they ended up but I always wondered.

The life of a bee seems so dramatic. It involves fierce allegiance to a queen and splinter factions when some of the hive split off and follow a new queen to a new country. I’m sure there are factions and intrigue involved in the decisions and perhaps wars as the two group separate.

It would make for a pretty epic movie. Or novel. I’d like to write it some day. I’d call it ‘The Life of A Queen.’