Where was ‘Leave it to Beaver’s’ hometown?

Do you remember Leave it to Beaver? The old classic television show featuring Theodore “the Beaver” Cleaver and his apparently perfect family?

The show took place in Mayfield, though it was never revealed which state.

In fact, there are at least 27 towns named ‘Mayfield’ across the U.S.

But Jerry Mathers, the actor who played the Beav, explained as an adult that they never specified a state because Mayfield was meant to be a symbol for anywhere and everywhere, so that every viewer could feel like this idyllic hometown life was right in their own backyard.

I like that idea. That there’s an idyllic hometown for everyone.

(thanks MissouriQuiltCo.com)

Lazy People Invent Things Because …

Lech Walesa, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, once said: “I’m lazy. But it’s the lazy people who invented the wheel and the bicycle because they didn’t like walking or carrying things.” 

Call it laziness, creativity, or genius, whatever it is, I love finding tools that help me get things done in a smarter way. Such smart and lazy people have given the world inventions like a baby romper that dusts the floor while they crawl, glasses with mirrors arranged so that you can read a book in your lap even when you lie down flat, and suitcases that your kids can ride on through the airport like a scooter.

Most of the people I know, including me, can be classified as lazy and we all not only invent things to make life easier (if we are the inventive type), we appreciate anything someone else has already invented for us.

(thanks MissouriQuiltCo)

Following Rules — Or Not

Following Rules — Or Not.When I was a little girl I was a serious rule-follower. Something as small as a disappointed glance from an authority figure was enough to make my stomach churn. So when my first grade teacher got tired of wasted art supplies and made a rule that the kids needed to stop breaking crayons just for fun, you’d think I would easily fall in line.

But something got into me that day, and when I picked up my perfect red crayon to draw I suddenly had an urge I just couldn’t resist. When Mrs. Robbins wasn’t looking, I held my crayon in two hands and broke it easily with a satisfying snap.

Later that night, my mom just couldn’t understand why I was too sick to eat dinner and went to bed with a tummy ache.

I finally confessed, but the tummy ache lasted into the weekend, until my dad ran into Mrs. Robbins at the grocery store, told my story, and she said all was forgiven.

As an adult I looked back and realized the grocery store meeting was very likely a merciful fantasy fabricated by my dad just to make me feel better. But it worked!

(thanks MissouriQuiltCo.com)

Heritage Quilts

The United States has a beautiful history of quilting, influenced by all of the different ethnic groups that settled here over the years, as well as the necessity of ingenuity and hard work to survive the early days. One tradition was for a young girl to make thirteen quilts before she was married, twelve for everyday use in her future home, and a wedding quilt, her masterpiece which she would begin work on once she was engaged. Friends and family would gather to help her quilt this final quilt. A form of this tradition continues today, every time we make a quilt for a special couple tying the knot. Quilting is our heritage Thanks, Missouriquiltco.com

ℜ𝔢𝔩𝔞𝔵𝔞𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔫 𝔖𝔞𝔱𝔲𝔯𝔞𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔫?

ℑ 𝔰𝔲𝔰𝔭𝔢𝔠𝔱 𝔯𝔢𝔩𝔞𝔵𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔦𝔰 𝔢𝔳𝔢𝔫 𝔪𝔬𝔯𝔢 𝔦𝔪𝔭𝔬𝔯𝔱𝔞𝔫𝔱 𝔦𝔫 𝔱𝔬𝔡𝔞𝔶’𝔰 𝔴𝔬𝔯𝔩𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔫 𝔦𝔱 𝔴𝔞𝔰 𝔦𝔫 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔭𝔞𝔰𝔱. 𝔅𝔲𝔱 𝔯𝔢𝔩𝔞𝔵𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔦𝔫 𝔞 𝔭𝔬𝔬𝔩 𝔣𝔲𝔩𝔩 𝔬𝔣 𝔰𝔞𝔨𝔢, 𝔠𝔬𝔣𝔣𝔢𝔢, 𝔤𝔯𝔢𝔢𝔫 𝔱𝔢𝔞, 𝔬𝔯 𝔢𝔳𝔢𝔫 𝔯𝔢𝔡 𝔴𝔦𝔫𝔢? ℜ𝔢𝔞𝔩𝔩𝔶? 𝔜𝔬𝔲 𝔠𝔞𝔫 𝔦𝔫 𝔍𝔞𝔭𝔞𝔫, 𝔴𝔥𝔦𝔠𝔥 𝔪𝔞𝔨𝔢𝔰 𝔪𝔢 𝔯𝔢𝔞𝔩𝔦𝔷𝔢 𝔥𝔬𝔴 𝔡𝔦𝔣𝔣𝔢𝔯𝔢𝔫𝔱 𝔠𝔲𝔩𝔱𝔲𝔯𝔢𝔰 𝔠𝔞𝔫 𝔟𝔢 𝔣𝔯𝔬𝔪 𝔬𝔫𝔢 𝔞𝔫𝔬𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔯. ℑ 𝔪𝔢𝔞𝔫, 𝔥𝔬𝔴 𝔡𝔬 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔶 𝔨𝔢𝔢𝔭 𝔭𝔢𝔬𝔭𝔩𝔢 𝔣𝔯𝔬𝔪 𝔡𝔯𝔦𝔫𝔨𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔰𝔱𝔲𝔣𝔣 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔶 𝔞𝔯𝔢 𝔟𝔞𝔱𝔥𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔦𝔫? 𝔖𝔠𝔯𝔢𝔞𝔪𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔬𝔯 𝔶𝔢𝔩𝔩𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔦𝔰 𝔯𝔢𝔠𝔬𝔪𝔪𝔢𝔫𝔡𝔢𝔡 𝔦𝔫 𝔬𝔲𝔯 𝔠𝔲𝔩𝔱𝔲𝔯𝔢 𝔞𝔰 𝔞 𝔴𝔞𝔶 𝔱𝔬 𝔯𝔢𝔩𝔢𝔞𝔰𝔢 𝔱𝔢𝔫𝔰𝔦𝔬𝔫. 𝔄𝔩𝔩 𝔨𝔦𝔫𝔡𝔰 𝔬𝔣 𝔭𝔰𝔶𝔠𝔥𝔬𝔩𝔬𝔤𝔦𝔰𝔱 𝔱𝔶𝔭𝔢𝔰 𝔯𝔢𝔠𝔬𝔪𝔪𝔢𝔫𝔡 𝔦𝔱. ℑ𝔱’𝔰 𝔢𝔳𝔢𝔫 𝔤𝔬𝔱 𝔞 𝔫𝔞𝔪𝔢. 𝔖𝔠𝔯𝔢𝔞𝔪 𝔗𝔥𝔢𝔯𝔞𝔭𝔶. 𝔅𝔲𝔱 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔯𝔢 𝔠𝔞𝔫 𝔟𝔢 𝔭𝔯𝔬𝔟𝔩𝔢𝔪𝔰 𝔴𝔦𝔱𝔥 𝔱𝔥𝔦𝔰 𝔭𝔞𝔯𝔱𝔦𝔠𝔲𝔩𝔞𝔯 𝔱𝔢𝔠𝔥𝔫𝔦𝔮𝔲𝔢. 𝔄𝔫𝔡 𝔰𝔬𝔩𝔲𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔫𝔰 𝔱𝔬 𝔱𝔥𝔬𝔰𝔢 𝔭𝔯𝔬𝔟𝔩𝔢𝔪𝔰. ℑ 𝔯𝔢𝔞𝔡 𝔬𝔫𝔢 𝔰𝔬𝔩𝔲𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔫 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔬𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔯 𝔡𝔞𝔶 𝔦𝔫 𝔞 𝔟𝔩𝔬𝔤. 𝔗𝔥𝔢 𝔟𝔩𝔬𝔤𝔤𝔢𝔯 𝔰𝔲𝔤𝔤𝔢𝔰𝔱𝔢𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱 𝔦𝔣 𝔶𝔬𝔲 𝔩𝔦𝔳𝔢 𝔦𝔫 𝔞 𝔥𝔢𝔞𝔳𝔦𝔩𝔶 𝔭𝔬𝔭𝔲𝔩𝔞𝔱𝔢𝔡 𝔞𝔯𝔢𝔞 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔡𝔬𝔫’𝔱 𝔴𝔞𝔫𝔱 𝔭𝔢𝔬𝔭𝔩𝔢 𝔱𝔬 𝔠𝔞𝔩𝔩 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔩𝔞𝔴 𝔴𝔥𝔢𝔫 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔶 𝔥𝔢𝔞𝔯 𝔶𝔬𝔲 𝔰𝔠𝔯𝔢𝔞𝔪𝔦𝔫𝔤, 𝔶𝔬𝔲 𝔪𝔦𝔤𝔥𝔱 𝔠𝔬𝔫𝔰𝔦𝔡𝔢𝔯 𝔭𝔯𝔢𝔱𝔢𝔫𝔡𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱 𝔶𝔬𝔲’𝔯𝔢 𝔱𝔯𝔶𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔱𝔬 𝔤𝔢𝔱 𝔞 𝔣𝔯𝔦𝔢𝔫𝔡’𝔰 𝔞𝔱𝔱𝔢𝔫𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔫. 𝔖𝔦𝔪𝔭𝔩𝔶 𝔶𝔢𝔩𝔩 𝔞 𝔪𝔞𝔡𝔢-𝔲𝔭 𝔫𝔞𝔪𝔢 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔰𝔬𝔬𝔫 𝔶𝔬𝔲’𝔩𝔩 𝔥𝔞𝔳𝔢 𝔞𝔩𝔩 𝔨𝔦𝔫𝔡𝔰 𝔬𝔣 𝔭𝔢𝔬𝔭𝔩𝔢 𝔥𝔢𝔩𝔭𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔶𝔬𝔲 𝔣𝔦𝔫𝔡 𝔰𝔬𝔪𝔢𝔬𝔫𝔢. 𝔚𝔥𝔬 𝔨𝔫𝔬𝔴𝔰, 𝔶𝔬𝔲 𝔪𝔦𝔤𝔥𝔱 𝔤𝔢𝔱 𝔰𝔬𝔪𝔢 𝔫𝔢𝔴 𝔣𝔯𝔦𝔢𝔫𝔡𝔰 𝔬𝔲𝔱 𝔬𝔣 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔡𝔢𝔞𝔩. 𝔗𝔥𝔞𝔱 𝔴𝔬𝔲𝔩𝔡 𝔟𝔢 𝔯𝔢𝔞𝔩𝔩𝔶 𝔤𝔬𝔬𝔡 𝔣𝔬𝔯 𝔰𝔱𝔯𝔢𝔰𝔰. 𝔒𝔯 𝔡𝔬 𝔴𝔥𝔞𝔱 ℑ 𝔡𝔬. ℑ’𝔪 𝔣𝔬𝔯𝔱𝔲𝔫𝔞𝔱𝔢 𝔱𝔬 𝔩𝔦𝔳𝔢 𝔦𝔫 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔫𝔬𝔯𝔱𝔥 𝔴𝔬𝔬𝔡𝔰 𝔬𝔣 𝔐𝔦𝔫𝔫𝔢𝔰𝔬𝔱𝔞, 𝔰𝔬 𝔴𝔥𝔢𝔫 𝔩𝔦𝔣𝔢 𝔦𝔰 𝔞 𝔟𝔦𝔱 𝔪𝔲𝔠𝔥, ℑ 𝔰𝔦𝔪𝔭𝔩𝔶 𝔴𝔞𝔩𝔨 𝔬𝔲𝔱𝔰𝔦𝔡𝔢 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔨𝔢𝔢𝔭 𝔤𝔬𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔲𝔫𝔱𝔦𝔩 ℑ’𝔪 𝔟𝔢𝔶𝔬𝔫𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔶𝔞𝔯𝔡, 𝔴𝔥𝔦𝔠𝔥 𝔦𝔰 𝔡𝔢𝔣𝔦𝔫𝔢𝔡 𝔟𝔶 𝔴𝔥𝔢𝔯𝔢 𝔴𝔢 𝔰𝔱𝔬𝔭 𝔠𝔲𝔱𝔱𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔤𝔯𝔞𝔰𝔰 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱 𝔳𝔞𝔯𝔦𝔢𝔰 𝔣𝔯𝔬𝔪 𝔶𝔢𝔞𝔯 𝔱𝔬 𝔶𝔢𝔞𝔯, 𝔡𝔢𝔭𝔢𝔫𝔡𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔬𝔫 𝔥𝔬𝔴 𝔞𝔪𝔟𝔦𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔲𝔰 𝔴𝔢 𝔞𝔯𝔢 𝔟𝔲𝔱 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔯𝔢 𝔦𝔰 𝔞𝔩𝔴𝔞𝔶𝔰 𝔞 𝔡𝔢𝔪𝔞𝔯𝔠𝔞𝔱𝔦𝔬𝔫 𝔟𝔢𝔱𝔴𝔢𝔢𝔫 𝔶𝔞𝔯𝔡 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔣𝔬𝔯𝔢𝔰𝔱. 𝔄𝔫𝔶𝔴𝔞𝔶, ℑ 𝔧𝔲𝔰𝔱 𝔨𝔢𝔢𝔭 𝔴𝔞𝔩𝔨𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔲𝔫𝔱𝔦𝔩 ℑ’𝔪 𝔦𝔫 𝔤𝔯𝔞𝔰𝔰 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱’𝔰 𝔨𝔫𝔢𝔢 𝔡𝔢𝔢𝔭 𝔬𝔯 𝔡𝔢𝔢𝔭𝔢𝔯 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔞𝔪 𝔰𝔲𝔯𝔯𝔬𝔲𝔫𝔡𝔢𝔡 𝔟𝔶 𝔱𝔯𝔢𝔢𝔰 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔫 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔰𝔱𝔯𝔢𝔰𝔰 𝔧𝔲𝔰𝔱 𝔪𝔢𝔩𝔱𝔰 𝔞𝔴𝔞𝔶. 𝔘𝔫𝔩𝔢𝔰𝔰 𝔦𝔱’𝔰 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔪𝔦𝔡𝔡𝔩𝔢 𝔬𝔣 𝔴𝔦𝔫𝔱𝔢𝔯 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔰𝔫𝔬𝔴 𝔦𝔰 𝔱𝔥𝔯𝔢𝔢 𝔣𝔢𝔢𝔱 𝔡𝔢𝔢𝔭 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔢 𝔱𝔢𝔪𝔭𝔢𝔯𝔞𝔱𝔲𝔯𝔢 𝔦𝔰 𝔚𝔄𝔜 𝔟𝔢𝔩𝔬𝔴 𝔷𝔢𝔯𝔬. 𝔗𝔥𝔢𝔫 ℑ 𝔰𝔱𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔞𝔱 𝔞 𝔴𝔦𝔫𝔡𝔬𝔴 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔯𝔢𝔪𝔦𝔫𝔡 𝔪𝔶𝔰𝔢𝔩𝔣 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱 𝔦𝔱’𝔰 𝔞𝔟𝔰𝔬𝔩𝔲𝔱𝔢𝔩𝔶 𝔟𝔢𝔞𝔲𝔱𝔦𝔣𝔲𝔩 𝔬𝔲𝔱 𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔯𝔢 (𝔴𝔥𝔦𝔠𝔥 𝔦𝔱 𝔦𝔰!) 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔥𝔬𝔴 𝔣𝔬𝔯𝔱𝔲𝔫𝔞𝔱𝔢 ℑ 𝔞𝔪 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱 ℑ 𝔡𝔬𝔫’𝔱 𝔥𝔞𝔳𝔢 𝔱𝔬 𝔤𝔬 𝔬𝔲𝔱 𝔦𝔫 𝔰𝔲𝔠𝔥 𝔯𝔦𝔡𝔦𝔠𝔲𝔩𝔬𝔲𝔰𝔩𝔶 𝔠𝔬𝔩𝔡 𝔴𝔢𝔞𝔱𝔥𝔢𝔯 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔱 𝔩𝔦𝔱𝔱𝔩𝔢 𝔪𝔢𝔫𝔱𝔞𝔩 𝔢𝔵𝔢𝔯𝔠𝔦𝔰𝔢 𝔴𝔬𝔯𝔨𝔰 𝔢𝔳𝔢𝔯𝔶 𝔱𝔦𝔪𝔢. 𝔖𝔱𝔯𝔢𝔰𝔰 𝔦𝔰 𝔤𝔬𝔫𝔢! (𝔱𝔥𝔞𝔫𝔨𝔰 𝔐𝔦𝔰𝔰𝔬𝔲𝔯𝔦𝔔𝔲𝔦𝔩𝔱ℭ𝔬.𝔠𝔬𝔪)

Naming Games

ℙ𝕖𝕠𝕡𝕝𝕖 𝕙𝕒𝕧𝕖 𝕗𝕦𝕟 𝕟𝕒𝕞𝕚𝕟𝕘 𝕥𝕨𝕚𝕟 𝕓𝕒𝕓𝕚𝕖𝕤. ℂ𝕠𝕟𝕤𝕚𝕕𝕖𝕣 𝔹𝕠𝕟𝕟𝕚𝕖 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔻𝕠𝕟𝕟𝕚𝕖, 𝕋𝕒𝕪𝕝𝕠𝕣 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝕋𝕪𝕝𝕖𝕣, 𝕠𝕣 𝔸𝕧𝕒 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔸𝕟𝕟𝕒. 𝕆𝕣, 𝕨𝕚𝕥𝕙 𝕒 𝕓𝕚𝕥 𝕞𝕠𝕣𝕖 𝕚𝕞𝕒𝕘𝕚𝕟𝕒𝕥𝕚𝕠𝕟, 𝔻𝕠𝕣𝕠𝕥𝕙𝕪 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔻𝕒𝕤𝕙𝕚𝕖𝕝 (𝔻𝕠𝕥 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔻𝕒𝕤𝕙), 𝕀𝕟𝕕𝕚 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔸𝕟𝕟𝕒, 𝔹𝕒𝕤𝕜𝕚𝕟 𝕒𝕟𝕕 ℝ𝕠𝕓𝕓𝕚𝕟𝕤, 𝔸𝕓𝕖 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝕃𝕚𝕟𝕔𝕠𝕝𝕟, 𝔹𝕖𝕟 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝕁𝕖𝕣𝕣𝕪, 𝕠𝕣 𝔼𝕝𝕚𝕫𝕒𝕓𝕖𝕥𝕙 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔹𝕖𝕥𝕙𝕒𝕟𝕪 (𝔹𝕖𝕥𝕙 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝔹𝕖𝕥𝕙). 𝕀 𝕝𝕠𝕧𝕖 𝕡𝕖𝕠𝕡𝕝𝕖 𝕨𝕚𝕥𝕙 𝕤𝕦𝕔𝕙 𝕚𝕞𝕒𝕘𝕚𝕟𝕒𝕥𝕚𝕠𝕟! (𝕋𝕙𝕒𝕟𝕜𝕤 𝕄𝕚𝕤𝕤𝕠𝕦𝕣𝕚ℚ𝕦𝕚𝕝𝕥ℂ𝕠.𝕔𝕠𝕞)

Windy Chicago

The city of Chicago has been known by many nicknames, but it is most widely recognized as the “Windy City.”

The earliest known reference to the “Windy City” was actually to Green Bay in 1856 but in 1876 repeated efforts to label Chicago with this nickname involved Chicago’s rivalry with Cincinnati.

The term “Windy City” was popularized by New York City editor, Charles Dana, in The Sun during the bidding for the 1893 Columbian Exposition. Journalists referred to the fact that Chicago residents were ‘windbags’ and ‘full of hot air’ in an effort to help Cincinnati be chosen for the Exposition.

Chicago won the Exposition in spite of the label, which did not please Dana.

But the popularity of the nickname has endured, long after the Cincinnati rivalry and the Columbian Exposition ended.

As a former Chicago resident — I was born there — I’m not sure how I feel about the nickname. Actually, I believe it’s more accurate than most Chicagoans care to admit.

Thanks Wikipedia

Pizza Anyone?

2018 5 17

The Aztecs grew tomatoes but Cortés brought the seeds to Europe. He thought they’d look nice in gardens. Like pretty, round, red flowers. Soon, however, aristocrats – the only people able to afford flower gardens — nibbled those pretty red flowers and discovered they were delicious and soon lots of aristocrats were eating tomatoes. And, occasionally, dying. From tomatoes? Yep. It happened. It really did. Which meant they were poisonous, right?

Actually, no, but it took a while before people knew why they were dying. It was because flatware of the time was made of pewter which has a high lead content and that acidic foods – like tomatoes – caused the lead to leach out of the flatware and into the food, resulting in lead poisoning.

Italians, however, never thought tomatoes were poisonous (maybe they didn’t use pewter flatware?) and when Queen Margarite came to Naples for a visit, someone invented pizza, including the three colors of the Italian flag – red, white, and green – to honor the visiting queen. Green peppers, white cheese and red tomatoes. Tomatoes have been included as a basic pizza ingredient ever since.

Then those Italians emigrated to America and brought pizza with them.

At which time, Americans had to make a choice. Pizza or death by tomato poisoning?

Given such a choice, which would you choose? Pizza, of course, especially since none of those Italians who ate tons of the pies died forthwith. And also because Americans are both smart and a bunch of foodies who like a challenge.

And the rest is history.

Pizza history, that is.

Some flowers are tough! Not mine.

I always thought of flowers as delicate and fragile. And some are. But not all. Some of the loveliest are some of the toughest.

Lotus flowers, for instance, begin life in the yucky, muddy bottom of a pond where they struggle until they grow enough to reach the water’s surface where they finally have fresh air and sunlight. They don’t give up. Good for them!

Poppies don’t have it easy, either. Their seeds lie dormant in the dirt for a long time. Years and years. You’d think they don’t exist, with people walking carelessly all over them. That continues until the ground is disturbed and then they begin growing, suddenly, surprising people who’d forgot they existed and turning all that broken ground into a field of color. Remember the battlefields of Europe during WWII? How poets spoke of the poppies that sprang to life there? It’s what they do because they are tough.

The purple mountain saxifrage is a tiny, sweet flower that grows at higher altitudes than possibly any other flower on earth and brings a touch of color to the harsh landscape found at the top of the world. The top of the world! A place of cold and lack of oxygen and thousand-foot cliffs that scare people like me to death! But for these flowers, it’s home.

Every day, when I water my own picky blooms, I remind them how fortunate they are to live in my yard where everything is provided and all they have to do in return is be beautiful.

I don’t think they listen.

Because they know their only job is to be lovely.