Finding Eden by C Beavers

Finding Eden  http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009J8EFF0

Review of Finding Eden by Camilla Beavers

This is the perfect example of a young adult urban fantasy story so I thought I’d review it here. And, by the way, I liked it. Most of all, I loved the cover.

It’s the story of Eden, a high school student close to graduation, who has always known she was ‘different’ because she could read the colors around people. That’s auras to those of you conversant with psychic stuff. I’ve known a couple people who said they could read auras. I don’t know if I believe them or not. Maybe I do, a little.

Anyway, Eden is informed by a really hunky new student that she’s the granddaughter of the king of the Fae world and is needed back home because her grandfather was murdered and someone has to take charge of the kingdom. Her father informs her that, yes, her mother (deceased) was the king’s daughter so yes, she’s about to become a queen. She agrees and goes with the hunky new student who turns out to be her personal security detail in this world sent when her grandfather was murdered to make sure she was safe.

From there the plot is predictable. She overcomes the bad guys, saves the throne, becomes a decent if not great queen and marries the hunky security guy. Like I said, it’s all predictable stuff.

But what’s wrong with predictable? I read romances because I know there’s a happily-ever-after ending. I dislike grim, depressing, horrific endings. I hate the feeling they leave with me. I like the feeling I get after reading a book with a happy ending. And if the way to get to that predictable happily-ever-after ending and the feeling it engenders is through a predictable story line, then I’m all for it.

And, yes, the grammar and typos and spelling, etc, were well vetted and nothing took me from the story. So, all in all, it was a decent read, even more so since it was free, at least for now.

I’m not sure I’d have chosen it if it cost money because I knew it would be predictable and that there are a lot of decent predictable books out there for free. But the cover was great, so maybe I would have paid something for it after all and I’d have been glad I did.

Unicorn Bait by S.A.Hunter

novel Unicorn Bait

My second book review.  Unicorn Bait by S.A.Hunter.  Hey, I like fun fantasy stories!

This is such a story and the title is the most fun thing of all but I won’t tell you what the unicorn bait is because that would be a spoiler.  But I’ll say this much.  It made reading the book worth it in spite of the fact that, to me at least, the book was a little longer than necessary.  A bit wordy.  And not exactly high English but definitely readable.

It’s a familiar tale with a twist.  Modern day woman inherits a joke unicorn horn from her father that turns out to be the real thing and when she dusts it off she’s whisked away to a magical kingdom where unicorns and magic are commonplace.  Since her only wish is to return to her home and since she’s smart enough to figure out that it was the unicorn horn that got her there, she figures that she needs another one to whisk her back. The rest of the book is the search for a unicorn and a virgin (which she isn’t) to use as bait because, as everyone knows, unicorns only communicate with virgins.  And, of course, in the process she falls in love with the prince of the kingdom who starts out being nasty and ends up being nice even though he remains a little rough around the edges.  Much better than Prince Charming, to my way of thinking.

So there you have it.  I’m discovering that I actually enjoy writing reviews though I’ll never write a bad review.  If I don’t like a book (and I’ve started many books I didn’t like)  I don’t review it at all.  I just put it down without finishing it.

Eco-fiction

I recently joined a new group on Goodreads.  I don’t belong to many groups and I’m very picky about the ones I do join.  But this one sounded interesting when I ran across the name.  So I took a look.  What’s eco-fiction?

As it turns out, eco-fiction is what I write.  Okay, it’s one genre my work fits into, along with several others.  Because, like many writers, I don’t worry about fitting my story into any one box.  The result, honesty forces me to add, is that when it’s time to market what I’ve written, I’m truly frustrated because… surprise, surprise… it doesn’t neatly fit into any one genre.  Thus it’s difficult to market.

Anyway,to return to the subject of this post, it seems that eco-fiction is fiction of any kind that celebrates, describes, or promotes the natural world.  Dune is eco-fiction.

Really?  Well, if Dune fits the genre of eco-fiction, my books do too, as well as those other genres my books have been assigned to.  Fantasy.  Sci-fi.  Contemporary.  Paranormal.  Romance.  And so on. And  I’m sure other writers have books that fit this genre and aren’t being marketed as such because they don’t know the genre exists.  Just like I’d never heard of it until I ran across that group on Goodreads.

But I have a special feel for this new label.  Eco-fiction.  I love it! I plan on using the term as often as possible.  Who knows?  Maybe it’ll become mainstream.