French Vanilla and other French stuff.

The French are good at a lot of things, you know?

Bread, chocolate, art and literature, the Statue of Liberty (thanks, guys!), science (way to go Marie Curie!), the list goes on and on.

Where would we be without our French brothers and sisters? Not drinking pasteurized milk, watching movies, scuba diving, driving around on inflatable tires.

And, of course French vanilla, though French vanilla isn’t from France. (Most vanillas are named from their country of origin.) It’s a way the French made vanilla ice cream. Richer, caramelized, and with egg-based custards. Whatever the reason, again I thank France for their contribution to the wonderful taste of French vanilla.

(thanks MissouriQuiltCo.com)

The Color Blue — Who Knew?

An enormous portion of the world we see is blue, between the sky above us and the oceans and lakes that cover the earth. It’s no wonder that most people love blue.

But the thing about the ocean and sky is that the color can’t be bottled up—unlike flowers, rocks, and all the other things people historically used to make dye. The color blue is all around us, but for so long it was out of our reach.

Today, thanks to the modern science of dying things, we can all dress like queens and emperors every time we throw on a blue t-shirt!

(thanks MissouriQuiltco.com)

Flower Petals

Lovers scatter them and flower girls line wedding aisles with them, but beware, a stray flower petal could get you in big trouble.

One flower shop in England found themselves in court after a passerby slipped on a single fallen flower petal and sued for 1.5 million pounds!

Maybe you should think twice before scattering petals across the path of your beloved, you wouldn’t want to end up with a lawsuit!

(thanks MissouriQuiltCo.com)

Following Rules — Or Not

Following Rules — Or Not.When I was a little girl I was a serious rule-follower. Something as small as a disappointed glance from an authority figure was enough to make my stomach churn. So when my first grade teacher got tired of wasted art supplies and made a rule that the kids needed to stop breaking crayons just for fun, you’d think I would easily fall in line.

But something got into me that day, and when I picked up my perfect red crayon to draw I suddenly had an urge I just couldn’t resist. When Mrs. Robbins wasn’t looking, I held my crayon in two hands and broke it easily with a satisfying snap.

Later that night, my mom just couldn’t understand why I was too sick to eat dinner and went to bed with a tummy ache.

I finally confessed, but the tummy ache lasted into the weekend, until my dad ran into Mrs. Robbins at the grocery store, told my story, and she said all was forgiven.

As an adult I looked back and realized the grocery store meeting was very likely a merciful fantasy fabricated by my dad just to make me feel better. But it worked!

(thanks MissouriQuiltCo.com)

The sun burns hot and fast

The sun is the brightest star in our sky, but that’s just because it happens to be the closest. Deneb, a star a couple thousand light years away, is far brighter than the sun but because it burns so much brighter, it will also burn out much faster than the sun. Our sun will last 1,000 times longer than Deneb. Which makes me think of my recent husband. Like whomever Edna St Vincent Millay wrote about in her poem, he lived life fully. Burned his candle at both ends. Wore his body out. But he enjoyed every day. Every minute. Every second. I’m different. I live slowly, always did. I suspect that in the final reckoning we’ll both have had about the same amount of actual living during our times on earth.